What kind of paint does a body shop use to paint a car?

Post your technical queries / problems here!
Post Reply
Message
Author
pryantcc
Posts: 289
Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 6:35 pm

What kind of paint does a body shop use to paint a car?

#1 Post by pryantcc » Tue Feb 20, 2018 5:01 pm

Hi,
I have a tin of fancy primer that I want to use on my car. The data sheet says that it can be overcoated with epoxy and polyurethane paints. Does anyone know if that covers “normal” car paints??
Thanks,
Paul.

sierra3dr
Posts: 411
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2011 10:20 am

Re: What kind of paint does a body shop use to paint a car?

#2 Post by sierra3dr » Sat Feb 24, 2018 7:58 pm

2k or celly is car paint epoxy or polyurethane is for floors. What brand is it?

pryantcc
Posts: 289
Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 6:35 pm

Re: What kind of paint does a body shop use to paint a car?

#3 Post by pryantcc » Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:09 am

Doesn't 2K just mean the paint has 2 components, a paint and a hardener/catalyst? The primer I'm using could be called a 2K paint because it needs a hardener to be added.

This is the stuff that I've got:
https://www.promain.co.uk/sigmacover-69 ... rimer.html

User avatar
gazza82
Posts: 154
Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2015 7:38 pm

Re: What kind of paint does a body shop use to paint a car?

#4 Post by gazza82 » Wed Mar 07, 2018 4:15 pm

This product is the primer for the following systems:
  • LuL APR No. 1153 - M27.4 (XM92) Coating System for Maintenance Steel, for application to steel previously coated with bitumen to provide a minimum expected service life of 25 years.
  • LuL APR No. 1151 - XM92/M24 Coating System for Maintenance Steel for application to bridges and structures to provide a minimum expected service life of 25 years when spot blast cleaned to Sa 2½ or 15 years when power tool cleaned to St 3
  • Highways Item Approval Number 115
  • Network Rail System M24 (XM92) at 100 microns DFT

Doesn't look like the sort of primer you would use on a car body, unless you mean underside or chassis .. :shock:
"If you're driving on the edge ... you're leaving too much room!"

Retirement Project: '58 Austin A35 2-door with 1330cc Midget engine and many upgrades
Said goodbye: kept '98 Alfa Romeo 156 2.0 TSpark to 210K miles before tin worm struck

alabbasi
Posts: 241
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2011 9:54 pm

Re: What kind of paint does a body shop use to paint a car?

#5 Post by alabbasi » Fri Mar 09, 2018 4:52 pm

Urethane paint is solvent based paint which is different to water based paint. It's the good stuff with all the chemicals that will kill you. It can be either single stage or base / clear. 2k just means that there is a hardener component that chemically hardens the paint. I think that legislation has driven people to use water based paints in the UK. It's still the most commonly used paint in the US.

pryantcc
Posts: 289
Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 6:35 pm

Re: What kind of paint does a body shop use to paint a car?

#6 Post by pryantcc » Mon Mar 12, 2018 4:31 pm

gazza82 wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 4:15 pm
  • LuL APR No. 1151 - XM92/M24 Coating System for Maintenance Steel for application to bridges and structures to provide a minimum expected service life of 25 years when spot blast cleaned to Sa 2½ or 15 years when power tool cleaned to St 3

Doesn't look like the sort of primer you would use on a car body, unless you mean underside or chassis .. :shock:
25 years sounds pretty good to me! It’s what attracted me to this stuff in the first place.

pryantcc
Posts: 289
Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 6:35 pm

Re: What kind of paint does a body shop use to paint a car?

#7 Post by pryantcc » Mon Mar 12, 2018 4:33 pm

alabbasi wrote:
Fri Mar 09, 2018 4:52 pm
Urethane paint is solvent based paint which is different to water based paint. It's the good stuff with all the chemicals that will kill you. It can be either single stage or base / clear. 2k just means that there is a hardener component that chemically hardens the paint. I think that legislation has driven people to use water based paints in the UK. It's still the most commonly used paint in the US.
Thanks Al, this is what I was worried about. I guess the thing to do is to check with some painters.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests