breakdown truck

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suffolkpete
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Re: breakdown truck

#3121 Post by suffolkpete » Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:33 am

GHT wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 6:50 am
suffolkpete wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 6:27 am
You'll probably find that with that sort of power the batteries last for about 20 miles and take three days to recharge :D
You're probably right, but the speed that technology goes at these days, it will only be a matter of time. Back in 1986 I saw my first ever mobile phone, this fellow had, what looked like a small satchel slung over his shoulder, the satchel was for housing the battery, the phone was akin to a landline handset on top of the battery. It wasn't that I thought it wouldn't catch on, it just seemed like a lot of faff to be the first to have a must have. Texting back then was still to come.
That's got more to do with the power consumption of the mobile than the size of the battery. To run a car like that at full power for thirty minutes would require a battery of nearly 1 kWh.
To fully recharge it from a domestic supply at 7kW, the most allowed, would take 139 hours
The reason that electric is so powerful is because it does away with oscillation. A piston oscillates, meaning that it stop/starts as it goes up and down in the bore. If you can devise a way of just rotating, like a jet engine, like an electric motor or even like a sewing machine, you will have a much faster, more efficient power plant.
gas turbine cars never caught on
The new Vauxhall Corsa exceeds 200 miles between recharges and now Tesla have produced the long range battery giving their car 400 miles between charges. It's just my speculation of course, but it's not beyond the realms of fantasy to say that there might come a day where you pull into a garage and instead of putting fifty quid's worth of unleaded in, you simply swap out your batteries for re-charged ones, pay your money and drive off.
That will never happen. Manufacturers have the electric car users by the short and curlys. The battery will last about eight years and they will price them such that it is uneconomic to replace them so the car will have to be scrapped. They will never relinquish such a piece of planned obsolescence. Also how does the user know how much charge is in the replacement battery?
1974 Rover 2200 SC
1982 Matra Murena 1.6

Dick
Posts: 464
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:31 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3122 Post by Dick » Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:17 pm

suffolkpete wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:33 am
GHT wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 6:50 am
suffolkpete wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 6:27 am
You'll probably find that with that sort of power the batteries last for about 20 miles and take three days to recharge :D
You're probably right, but the speed that technology goes at these days, it will only be a matter of time. Back in 1986 I saw my first ever mobile phone, this fellow had, what looked like a small satchel slung over his shoulder, the satchel was for housing the battery, the phone was akin to a landline handset on top of the battery. It wasn't that I thought it wouldn't catch on, it just seemed like a lot of faff to be the first to have a must have. Texting back then was still to come.
That's got more to do with the power consumption of the mobile than the size of the battery. To run a car like that at full power for thirty minutes would require a battery of nearly 1 kWh.
To fully recharge it from a domestic supply at 7kW, the most allowed, would take 139 hours
The reason that electric is so powerful is because it does away with oscillation. A piston oscillates, meaning that it stop/starts as it goes up and down in the bore. If you can devise a way of just rotating, like a jet engine, like an electric motor or even like a sewing machine, you will have a much faster, more efficient power plant.
gas turbine cars never caught on
The new Vauxhall Corsa exceeds 200 miles between recharges and now Tesla have produced the long range battery giving their car 400 miles between charges. It's just my speculation of course, but it's not beyond the realms of fantasy to say that there might come a day where you pull into a garage and instead of putting fifty quid's worth of unleaded in, you simply swap out your batteries for re-charged ones, pay your money and drive off.
That will never happen. Manufacturers have the electric car users by the short and curlys. The battery will last about eight years and they will price them such that it is uneconomic to replace them so the car will have to be scrapped. They will never relinquish such a piece of planned obsolescence. Also how does the user know how much charge is in the replacement battery?
Im hoping pc will be doing an article about how to change the battery pack in the near future?

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JPB
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Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2011 3:24 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3123 Post by JPB » Fri Jul 10, 2020 6:29 am

"Vintage Voltage" (Quest on Freeview channel 114, Thursday evenings 10pm) is good watching for those who enjoy Mike & Ant but want all-electric content and no American production values (the show is made in Wales).
Last night's episode saw a Land Rover Defender converted to a sub 6 seconds to 60 yet even better than before off road beast, week before was a suicide door Fiat 500, circa early '60s and episode 1, 2 weeks ago, involved electrificating a rather lovely VW Karmann Ghia.
All episodes are available to stream or download on the Freeview play app or Freeview Play equipped TVs.
Oh, and the workshop has the obligatory cute dog to distract the viewer's attention from the fact that some lovely classics are being butchered beyond redemption! ;)

If only that Deafener had been a 300TDI, they wouldn't have needed to throw away a perfectly good engine as fossil fuels may be a thing of the past soon, but as long as fresh RSO is available at 47p per litre, who cares? :o
:scared:
J
"Home is where you park it", so the saying goes. That may yet come true.. :oops:

GHT
Posts: 1335
Joined: Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:09 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3124 Post by GHT » Fri Jul 10, 2020 5:01 pm

JPB wrote:
Fri Jul 10, 2020 6:29 am
If only that Deafener had been a 300TDI, they wouldn't have needed to throw away a perfectly good engine as fossil fuels may be a thing of the past soon, but as long as fresh RSO is available at 47p per litre, who cares? :o :scared:
Fossil fuel might well be on the way out, but you can run a diesel engine on anything from cooking oil to coal dust. Have you never had a whiff of burger & fries when behind a McDonald's delivery truck? https://www.mcdonalds.com/gb/en-gb/help ... icles.html

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JPB
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Re: breakdown truck

#3125 Post by JPB » Sat Jul 11, 2020 1:31 pm

GHT wrote:
Fri Jul 10, 2020 5:01 pm
Fossil fuel might well be on the way out, but you can run a diesel engine on anything from cooking oil to coal dust. Have you never had a whiff of burger & fries when behind a McDonald's delivery truck? https://www.mcdonalds.com/gb/en-gb/help ... icles.html
Absolutely, hence my comment about RSO costing only 47ppl. ;)
My van's engine is suitable for RSO (distributor style mechanical pump, filter housing that came from the factory with a pre heater built in and injection timing adjusted to take into account the higher Cetane value when RSO is compared to that filthy forecourt fuel) and occasionally gets corn oil when the price of RSO is higher, such as during the panic stage of a global crisis, when everyone is buying cooking oil that'll never be used before it turns rancid, but waste oils and those of uncertain origin aren't a great idea for any engine, unless processed (safely, bearing in mind that DIY oil preparation is illegal for a good reason - explosion risk caused by the solvents used to destroy animal fats, which cause severe preignition and potentially holed pistons but must be removed by licenced persons who have the correct equipment, not some tool in a hut who went online, didn't understand what had to be done yet did it regardless..)

So nothing of the common rail variety is likely to use veggie sourced fuel without damage or better yet; a bloody big bang and sudden, spectacular engine death. Veggie oils, none more so than pure RSO (47ppl at Booker Foods and only slightly more at other Cash & Carry premises), do improve the performance of my 80ish BHP / 300+ N/M torque, flat out at under 4000rpm van engine, as the timing adjustment is easy to do whilst driving, just leave the passenger side of the seat tipped back and the pump can be turned by hand when driving along.. Please do not take this as a recommended way to set up an engine for veggie fuel though, because it's most probably frowned upon, especially when used to create a smokescreen, but that's also grossly irresponsible and also misleading since the old van doesn't smoke at all when running veggie and the injectors & glow plugs looked like new when I eventually took them out to be checked in case they're in need of replacement after 28 years and lots of hundreds of thousands of Kilometres.

The 300TDI in the Discovery also feeds on RSO, and its current custodians are averaging 28.7mpg (measured the same way I do; brim-to-brim, always on flat ground when filled, so only likely to vary at the hands of the weather) using the stuff, meaning that their foot is lighter than mine and that they're finding another advantage. I put them forward for a cash and carry card so that they too can avoid having to queue at the Dairies to fill a trolley with as many 3 litre cans of RSO at a massive 99ppl as they can transport back down the travellator from the store to the car park beneath. I would still use the stuff at the higher price as it's not only cleaner but yes, GHT, that food-related smell has caused many folk to comment, mostly those who just spent several tens of thousands on a split new, common rail engined thing. All very smooth and refined for sure, but no, I tell them, they really shouldn't pour food products into their tanks. :|
J
"Home is where you park it", so the saying goes. That may yet come true.. :oops:

GHT
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Joined: Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:09 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3126 Post by GHT » Sat Jul 11, 2020 6:22 pm

I would be interested to know if there is a tax liability when running on veggie fuels. The reason that diesel fuel is blue is because it's tax paid at the pump, as opposed to red diesel, which isn't. Liquefied Petroleum Gas, Compressed Natural Gas and Electricity all fall within the remit of fuel duty, albeit at various reduced rates, so it does seem probable that the tax man is well aware of the fact that you can get two gallons of spent cooking oil along with your burger & fries.

Dick
Posts: 464
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:31 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3127 Post by Dick » Sun Jul 12, 2020 9:17 am

Thanks for vintage voltage programme.. i quite enjoyed it, although id like to know how much the landrover conversion cost?
now have moved the satellite dish again and changed the cables after a family of mice decided had eaten the ones in the ducting i can watch English tv again

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JPB
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Re: breakdown truck

#3128 Post by JPB » Sun Jul 12, 2020 10:06 am

GHT, it's barely worth risking used oil but whether you use the new stuff or have an approved reclamation facility in your home to reduce further still your vehicle's environmental impact, then no duty is payable on the first 2500 litres of veg-based fuel used in one year, thereafter duty should be paid so it's best to keep receipts. VAT is also payable on cooking oil that's purchased as fuel, but many suppliers simply claim that it's too much hassle to have two prices for the same product, which price to charge being dictated by the intended use.
So yes, veggie fuel does incur a charge but only once you've managed to drive your way through 2500 litres, or 550 Gallons which lasts me for around 15,400 miles or, seeing as my entire fleet came with metric odometers, nigh enough 21771 km.
In other words, much further than the van is going to be driven for the foreseeable future, rendering my tall Toyota entirely suitable for daily use, as long as I don't use too many tanks full of forecourt fuel, tempting when the local supermarket's pump price first fell in line with current conditions. Commercial users would obviously be paying fuel duty, unless they work from home or are part timers.😇

Rich, the cost was mentioned during the introductory scenes, where they rough out the details for the cameras, though presumably everything would by then have been planned well ahead, unless my cynicism is unjustified and they really did build a business on such a haphazard financial footing..
🤑
J
"Home is where you park it", so the saying goes. That may yet come true.. :oops:

GHT
Posts: 1335
Joined: Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:09 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3129 Post by GHT » Sun Jul 12, 2020 4:04 pm

JPB wrote:
Sun Jul 12, 2020 10:06 am
GHT, it's barely worth risking used oil but whether you use the new stuff or have an approved reclamation facility in your home to reduce further still your vehicle's environmental impact, then no duty is payable on the first 2500 litres of veg-based fuel used in one year, thereafter duty should be paid so it's best to keep receipts.
Where on earth do you find your information? Hours I spent, bloody hours searching for the tax liability on spent cooking oil and you just come up with it, like that! I'm impressed. I have no desire or designs to run The Sprinter on anything other than diesel bought at the pump, it was just one of those curious 'I wonder' moments, knowing how draconian the tax man can be, that is unless you are: Apple, Google, Facebook or any other corporation that employs highly paid accountants to dodge your rightful duty. I know what I would do, impose a windfall tax on them.

So glad you quoted miles and gallons, never could get my head around metrickery. In our house the central heating dial is in fahrenheit, the new cooker was a problem, it was in c*ntigrade and no alternative, so I had an exact copy of the aluminium strip made with fahrenheit markings, so much easier than c*ntigrade. Our kitchen and bathroom scales were both wedding presents and as I got married in 1968, we were all on imperial at the time so need to convert those scales. The MG only has an MPH clock and it also has a ten gallon tank. The temperature thermometer in our first aid box took some finding but now we have a civilised thermometer. A first aid box? My missus is a retired paramedic, we have a first aid box.

I've had some fun winding others up by declaring that I never keep a two metre social distance, I keep six feet away. but the best tease was with a young lady shop assistant. I buy a specialist coffee, Kenyan Peaberry, since you ask. I buy it at Whittards in Salisbury. "Two pounds of Peaberry please, ground for Cafetiere, in half pound bags." "We only sell it by the kilo. Sir," heavy on the sarcasm with, Sir. "No problem, can I have nine hundred and seven point eight four grams of Peaberry in four two hundred and twenty six point nine six grams bags, please," said with a big smile. "We only sell by the kilo, SIR!" "Well give me the nearest kilo-ounces to my requirement please." She weighs out a kilo, grinds it to my requirement, pours it into small 250 gram bags and then lectures me that we are now metric.

Holding my tongue and not arguing she tells me how much I must pay. Now I wouldn't dream of chatting up a young lady, a dirty old man I'm not. She is after all, somebody's daughter, but as I was with my missus and my intentions were seen as honourable, how could I resist. "I really must compliment you on keeping so trim, it's a delight to see someone taking care of themselves in today's society. If it's not too impertinent, may I ask you what you weigh?" A big smile ensues. She's taken the bait. "Thank you," she said, rather bashfully, or could that have been coquettishly? She waited a little, looked at my missus as though for reassurance, my missus smiled, "eight, two," she replied. "Eight stone, two pounds," I repeated, "well done you," more smiles. "Not kilos then?" I said. "Ouch," she answered, "that was below the belt." "Just proving that imperial is so indelible, despite the BBC's best efforts." "Touche," she said, as we left the shop.

Dick
Posts: 464
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:31 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3130 Post by Dick » Sun Jul 12, 2020 11:00 pm


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