breakdown truck

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GHT
Posts: 1311
Joined: Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:09 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3091 Post by GHT » Sun Jun 28, 2020 2:12 pm

Dick wrote:
Sun Jun 14, 2020 12:25 pm
For some reason I fancy a pointy hat
You sound like you're quoting my missus. She often says: "Sometimes you just have to put the pointy hat on to let them know who they are dealing with."
She's a retired paramedic, but back in her working days I remember telling her work partner that she's a witch. He always thought it a bit cruel, so I sweetened it and said that she's a beautiful witch.

Then one day, when they had just received an emergency call, the blue lights went on, the two tone horns went on and her foot went down. But the driver of some super duper Audi was having none of that. He floored it and overtook the ambulance, but had to cut back in dangerously in order to avoid the oncoming car. My Missus, unflustered as ever, just said: "A hex on you." A few minutes later they went past the Audi. The driver had pulled it over to the side of the road, his offside front and rear tyres punctured. My Missus just smiled knowingly, her colleague did a jaw drop. Back at the ambulance station he told everyone that her husband was right, adding: "Whatever you do, never, ever mess with her."

Dick
Posts: 408
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:31 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3092 Post by Dick » Sun Jun 28, 2020 2:33 pm

That's brilliant...one of my aunties was a paramedic and another was a nurse.. i can assure you that you wouldn't want to be ill when they were around..witches would be a polite description..

Dick
Posts: 408
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:31 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3093 Post by Dick » Sun Jun 28, 2020 2:34 pm

GHT wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 2:00 pm
Dick wrote:
Sat Jun 27, 2020 2:24 pm
Ght wanted a caravan?
https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/it ... 097788022/
First time I've seen a articulated car & caravan, although I do see many American style pick up trucks that tow an articulated caravan, especially at shows like The Goodwood Revival, where money isn't a problem for most. Last time we were there, price at the bar for a sparkling mineral water with ice and a dash of lime, plus a very small Peroni beer, £18;30.
Not very practical for me, what I need to do is sell my Mercedes Sprinter, buy a single car carrier and a drawbar caravan. But I wouldn't say no to glamping in this.
VW artic.jpg
Ooh I like it

Dick
Posts: 408
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:31 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3094 Post by Dick » Sun Jun 28, 2020 5:08 pm


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JPB
Posts: 10114
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2011 3:24 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3095 Post by JPB » Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm

I may well be wrong, but the structural add-on to the left side of the Trabant appears to have been welded continuously whereas, the right side looks like someone tacked the reinforcement pieces together and then ran out of either rods or gases. It looks strong enough in terms of the builder's use of triangles, but is the chap actually telling us that the converted car is a bit of a holy grail among Trabantists? I'm not knocking the way it's been put together, but although appearing to be well thought out - bar the unfinished welding on the right - the job could be described as somewhat less than professional. :|
Would I though? No, but only because if I ever do own a Trabant (bucket list item #241 in the car section of the list), then it has to be a Kombi for me, assuming that pedals are less difficult to reach than those on my Lada, which were so far off the floor that even with my size 11 driving foot, it was impossible to drive with my heel in contact with the floor, yet the similar looking FSO 125P had pedals which were perfectly easy to get along with.
A Barkas, like the one mentioned a few dozen posts above, sits at #74 in that list of mine, so ranks as my current most lusted after vehicle of Eastern European origin and, although they too came with too many pedals, I would lash something up in order to be able to drive such a thing.
J
"Home is where you park it", so the saying goes. That may yet come true.. :oops:

GHT
Posts: 1311
Joined: Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:09 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3096 Post by GHT » Sun Jun 28, 2020 9:32 pm

JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
I may well be wrong,
Indeed you are.
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
but the structural add-on to the left side of the Trabant appears to have been welded continuously whereas, the right side looks like someone tacked the reinforcement pieces together and then ran out of either rods or gases.

Silly boy, we all know that they were made of compressed cardboard and were never susceptible to the tin worm, so that tacked reinforcement wasn't really tacked, it was superglued.
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
It looks strong enough in terms of the builder's use of triangles,
One of my seven and a half ton vans used to rock and roll on the chassis, I didn't pay that much attention in the physics class at school, but I do remember that triangulation was the way to prevent that.(It didn't.)
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
but is the chap actually telling us that the converted car is a bit of a holy grail among Trabantists?
Nope, he's telling you that if you're not interested in coughing up three grand, sling your hook.
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
I'm not knocking the way it's been put together, but although appearing to be well thought out - bar the unfinished welding on the right - the job could be described as somewhat less than professional.

You mean bodged?
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
Would I though? No,
You're not so stupid after all.
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
but only because if I ever do own a Trabant
You would have to sell the Maxi to pay for it, and that would cause you sleepless nights.
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
(bucket list item #241 in the car section of the list), then it has to be a Kombi for me, assuming that pedals are less difficult to reach than those on my Lada,
Lada? Did you say Lada? I retract the stupid remark.
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
which were so far off the floor that even with my size 11 driving foot, it was impossible to drive with my heel in contact with the floor, yet the similar looking FSO 125P had pedals which were perfectly easy to get along with.
FSO 125P Was that the Poxy Fiat built in Poland?
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
A Barkas, like the one mentioned a few dozen posts above, sits at #74 in that list of mine, so ranks as my current most lusted after vehicle of Eastern European origin and, although they too came with too many pedals, I would lash something up in order to be able to drive such a thing.
Ah yes, the Bark Arse, or the Eastern European white van man, engine maker to the Trabant, that created the longest car ever. Seven meters including the smoke.
John, you really do need to get some therapy.
Barkas.jpg
Barkas.jpg (9.91 KiB) Viewed 63 times

User avatar
JPB
Posts: 10114
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2011 3:24 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3097 Post by JPB » Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:22 am

That's top quality blunt talking there, GHT.👍
J
"Home is where you park it", so the saying goes. That may yet come true.. :oops:

Dick
Posts: 408
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:31 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3098 Post by Dick » Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:23 am

GHT wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 9:32 pm
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
I may well be wrong,
Indeed you are.
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
but the structural add-on to the left side of the Trabant appears to have been welded continuously whereas, the right side looks like someone tacked the reinforcement pieces together and then ran out of either rods or gases.

Silly boy, we all know that they were made of compressed cardboard and were never susceptible to the tin worm, so that tacked reinforcement wasn't really tacked, it was superglued.
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
It looks strong enough in terms of the builder's use of triangles,
One of my seven and a half ton vans used to rock and roll on the chassis, I didn't pay that much attention in the physics class at school, but I do remember that triangulation was the way to prevent that.(It didn't.)
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
but is the chap actually telling us that the converted car is a bit of a holy grail among Trabantists?
Nope, he's telling you that if you're not interested in coughing up three grand, sling your hook.
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
I'm not knocking the way it's been put together, but although appearing to be well thought out - bar the unfinished welding on the right - the job could be described as somewhat less than professional.

You mean bodged?
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
Would I though? No,
You're not so stupid after all.
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
but only because if I ever do own a Trabant
You would have to sell the Maxi to pay for it, and that would cause you sleepless nights.
JPB wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:54 pm
(bucket list item #241 in the car section of the list), then it has to be a Kombi for me, assuming that pedals are less difficult to reach than those on my Lada,
Lada? Did you say Lada? I retract the stupid remark.

FSO 125P Was that the Poxy Fiat built in Poland?

Ah yes, the Bark Arse, or the Eastern European white van man, engine maker to the Trabant, that created the longest car ever. Seven meters including the smoke.
John, you really do need to get some therapy.
Barkas.jpg
Ght you win the internet 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

Dick
Posts: 408
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:31 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3099 Post by Dick » Wed Jul 01, 2020 9:25 am


Dick
Posts: 408
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:31 pm

Re: breakdown truck

#3100 Post by Dick » Wed Jul 01, 2020 7:00 pm


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