Zel's Fleet Blog...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes, Sinclair & AC Model 70

Post pictures and stories about your cars both present and past. Also post up "blogs" on your restoration projects - the more pictures the better! Note: blog-type threads often get few replies, but are often read by many members, and provide interest and motivation to other enthusiasts so don't be disappointed if you don't get many replies.
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Zelandeth
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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes, Sinclair & AC Model 70

#1031 Post by Zelandeth » Wed Sep 29, 2021 9:49 pm

3xpendable wrote:
Wed Sep 29, 2021 12:57 pm
Zelandeth wrote:
Tue Sep 28, 2021 11:47 pm
Yes it will be delivered. I know it's technically MOT exempt, but I'm not about to go all Vice Grip Garage on this...I know the front brakes are shot, there's a bulge in the nearside front tyre the size of an egg, we're missing part of the exhaust, and it's been sitting in a shed for at least 11 years. Plus there may have been an unresolved running issue prior to that. If I was still in the back end of rural Aberdeenshire, maybe if I changed the tyres, made sure it actually ran well and sorted the brakes...Down here...not happening!
I very much enjoy VGG, and he now lives not too far from me, but yeah I'd never drive home some of the stuff he does :lol: It IS easier to get away with it over here though, you'd die if you saw some of the wrecks being driven around here.
Oh my husband is from Michigan and did his post-grad studies in Iowa, so I've seen plenty! I still remember the first time I was overtaken on the Interstate by a pickup that must have been doing 80+ where you could visibly see the body bending in the middle where the bodywork was clearly holding the chassis together...

-- -- --

Back at it this afternoon.

Step 1 I decided was to label the handful of wiring connectors which would need to be removed. Have to admit this is one of the reasons I love K-Jet injection systems...so simple electronically.

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IAC valve is hiding just out of shot above the frame.

Checking it with a straight edge the spare head appears to be flat. Once it's had a good clean I'll inspect it closely for any signs of damage. Being used to relatively tiny and not performance focused OHV engines those valves look positively huge. I guess that's the real bonus of an oversquare engine with a crossflow head...more room for big valves.

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I'll be transferring my inlet manifold complete with fuel distributor over, but I'll be removing it from the head off the car. Both as the inlet manifold will give me something to get hold of to help lift it and because a couple of the retaining bolts are a real pig to get to with it in the car.

Definitely want to use mine though. Assure from it being filthy it looks like the plastic housing on the fuel metering head has started to fail on the spare.

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A vacuum leak there could cause absolute mayhem with regards to fuelling. Hoping the one currently on the car is better or I'll need to come up with some sort of repair.

Let the strip down commence!

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A huge surprise arrived midway through this when I went to tackle the part of the whole job I have been dreading the most. Removing the exhaust manifold.

I have never had to remove one on a car which has not been an absolutely horrible war of a job.

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Right up until today. This just unbolted from the head without any drama whatsoever. Okay, was a 50/50 mix of the nuts unscrewing and the studs winding out of the head but that's irrelevant as far as I'm concerned. I have never known a manifold come off that easy. Ever.

So...this brings us up to here:

[] Rocker cover, camshaft carriers/rocker assemblies and camshaft removed.

[] Exhaust manifold clear of head.

[] Coolant drained (block drain is hidden behind exhaust manifold, hence choosing that sequence). Oil had already been drained before we started.

[] Throttle cable and gearbox kickdown cables disconnected.

[] Various electrical connectors disconnected and de-threaded from the vacuum pipework they wound their way through before.

[] Vacuum line to brake servo disconnected at manifold end.

[] Engine earth strap disconnected from inlet manifold.

[] Fuel flow and return lines disconnected and moved clear (after discovering the hidden 10mm bolt holding them to the fuel distributor.

[] Disconnected heater hose from rear of head.

[] Removed half a dozen small bore vacuum lines, not forgetting the near invisible one to the gearbox.

[] Unbolted the thermostat housing from the front of the head.

[] Removed the top alternator mounting bolt.

[] Removed head bolts ( including the sneaky ones right at the front and the *really* sneaky one over by the warm up regulator masquerading as a plugged coolant sensor hole.

Yeah...to put into perspective how filthy this head is, this is how much gunk I had to scoop out of the head bolt heads before I could get the bit into them properly.

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That is probably the best part of 1 X 2 cm.

After a certain amount of swearing we got to the point where the head has split from the block.

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However I haven't so far been able to get it to separate around the full perimeter quite yet. I've also realised that due to the design of the timing chain tensioner that I need to faff around with that first before I can fully remove the head. The tensioner has a pin which passes through the middle of the loop of the chain...so either than pin needs to come out or the chain needs to be split. Apparently the inner of this pin however is threaded so you can wind a bolt into it and then pull it out of the head... we'll see if that's true tomorrow.

Kinda feels like a failure that I didn't get the head fully out today, I had really hoped to. We're about 95% of the way there though.

I can't start rebuilding things yet anyway as I'm still waiting on the head and inlet manifold gaskets (exhaust ones are of a type which should be fine to reuse) to arrive. Depending on what the weather is up to tomorrow we'll hopefully either get the whole head off the car or start stripping down and cleaning the spare one.

I'm telling myself to stop being bloody lazy and lap the valves in, though I can't for the life of me tell you where my valve spring compressor is...

It's a bit of a strange engine to work on...a lot of it is really well thought out and easy, but every now and then there are just a few bits which are seemingly needlessly complicated or awkward. The non-resettable timing chain tensioner and chain guide you need to use a puller/slide hammer to remove from the head immediately spring to mind.

I have checked the measurements of the head bolts and they're all well within spec so should be fine to be reused. I can't see any evidence of this head ever being off before so far so not a huge surprise.

Just need a really good clean as like everything, they're covered in sticky black tar.

As is now about 3/4 of my toolkit, the garage door, my hair and the side of the van.

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Hopefully we'll have good progress to report tomorrow.

Of course just to add to the fun the heavens decided to open just as I was tidying up...and immediately stopped about the second I closed the garage door.

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My website - aka. My *other* waste of time
Current fleet: 73 AC Model 70. 83 Citroen BX 14RE. 85 Sinclair C5. 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE. 86 Mercedes 230TE. 90 Mercedes 208D AutoTrail Navajo.

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JPB
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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes, Sinclair & AC Model 70

#1032 Post by JPB » Thu Sep 30, 2021 8:43 am

That exhaust manifold looks pretty straightforward... for someone who's used to swapping them on Triumph Dolomites, where they're not only the work of a Krypton Factor winner to reach with any implement known to humankind, but are also - almost always - prone to leaking after they've been on & off the first time thanks to Ricardo / Saab / Triumph having had the brilliant idea of attaching the manifold without any gasket. Aftermarket gaskets soon came along, but the presence of these (one for each port of course, because even more fun to keep in place until all of the studs are in) is quite literally the difference between taking the skin off the knuckles right down to the bone, and merely making a little blood come out.

I like the YouTube channel to which you both referred, but oddly, the only one of the videos he's done that didn't have me hiding my eyes and peeping through my fingers at some of the things he risked doing to get yet another long dead Buick to carry him the 600 miles home, was the one where he was reunited with that very lovely, black & white car that had once been in his custodianship years before. It at least looked mostly OK, until the leaks started to happen...
But can I be alone in struggling to learn that odd language he speaks? I've been trying to log some of the vocabulary, but gave up when he became just too much like "Professor" Stanley Unwin for my limited linguistic skill to catch up with.

I rescued my much-missed 911 targa from a garden in Huntly after travelling there to buy a couple of Reliant kitten bodies for a never started project. The drive home (I stayed over in Fyvie at the time) was, erm, "interesting," but I'd never do that again, even down this end of the country, where nobody seems to care about how broken a motor vehicle actually is, so it's good that at least someone has scruples, a concept seemingly lost on some of those who sell Test exempt old motors for a living. No names, but the well known, Yorkshire based trader I have in mind would be better off in the supermarket shelf stacking profession as that way, noone would be hurt.

Keep up the entertaining and most readable content please. Oh, and buy more Beige cars, beige is the next big thing to come on the new motors, Mark my words, it's bound to happen.

🤗
J
"Home is where you park it", so the saying goes. That may yet come true.. :oops:

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gazza82
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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes, Sinclair & AC Model 70

#1033 Post by gazza82 » Thu Sep 30, 2021 3:56 pm

The manifold studs on my 206 have neat Torx-shaped ends, only to find most of them simply rounded-off at the slightest hint of any torque.. and I ended up having to mole-grip a few out. Two weren't even in a position to get a socket on the end due to the power steering pump postion.

Removing the studs was to avoid having to remove the power steering pump where the fitting bolts and bracketry were probably designed by the same psychopath as the one who designed JPB's Dolomite.

Off to my trusty Peugeot dealer for some new ones but they were three studs short in their stock .. and one nut! .. but they rang the other dealer down the road and had them get the parts out to the front desk and ready for me to pop in on my way back and collect them which I thought was pretty decent.

(And all that to change a small leaking core plug in the cylinder head. Actually two core plugs .. if one was leaking, the other wasn't far behind!)
"If you're driving on the edge ... you're leaving too much room!"

Retirement Project: '59 Austin A35 2-door with 1330cc Midget engine and many upgrades
Said goodbye: got '98 Alfa Romeo 156 2.0 TSpark to 210K miles before tin worm struck

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Zelandeth
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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes, Sinclair & AC Model 70

#1034 Post by Zelandeth » Sat Oct 02, 2021 10:07 pm

Well so much for...well everything since lunchtime on Thursday I think it was.

The rest of my week and Saturday up until about an hour ago instead of getting anything I wanted done, instead was spent in the kitchen. Cleaning, removing, storing then cleaning where things had come from. All this to deal with an infestation of grain mites.

Oh...my...god...I hurt in places I didn't know I had, my hands are shredded and I hope I never have to smell vinegar ever again. I think we've pretty much got rid of the little blighters, but only time will tell at this point.

...Then I have to put everything back in again! Though at least that shouldn't take half as long as it's not going to involve cleaning everything the moment I pick it up.

I really hope to never see these those things again, ever.

Not...Fun...


So *hopefully* I can actually get back to doing something useful tomorrow or Monday. Which would be nice. I'm kinda hacked off at having lost three days to this mess. Had hoped to be putting things back together on the Merc by this point. Oh...well...aside from the fact that the head gasket set hasn't turned up yet. Apparently it's stuck in customs judging from the parcel tracking. Where it's been since Thursday. Oh what fun.

Just to add to the fun the leisure battery on the van appears to have packed in given it was showing under 9V despite having been charged only a couple of days ago. That'll be cheap to replace I'm sure...110Ah capacity if I remember right.

Oh, and water is peeing in somewhere in the upper offside rear corner. Right where I sorted last year. Blarg. That's probably just getting silicone sealant thrown at it along the edging strip for now as I simply don't have time to go pulling the coachwork apart right now (nor dealing with the can of worms that is opening) and we can fully investigate and do a more permanent fix in the spring.
My website - aka. My *other* waste of time
Current fleet: 73 AC Model 70. 83 Citroen BX 14RE. 85 Sinclair C5. 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE. 86 Mercedes 230TE. 90 Mercedes 208D AutoTrail Navajo.

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Zelandeth
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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes, Sinclair & AC Model 70

#1035 Post by Zelandeth » Mon Oct 04, 2021 11:59 pm

Distraction time...

Ugh...my head gasket set which has been stuck in customs since the middle of the week apparently is now on its way back to the sender according to the tracking. Deep joy. Fine, will go see if Motorserv can get the necessary bits in tomorrow.

In slightly less depressing news a little parcel arrived this morning. Buried within an improbably large amount of bubble wrap was this.

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As with many things which arrive in the post for me this falls under the heading of "was very expensive when it was new."

Around £140 - in 1973. That equates to somewhere around £1500 in 2021.

So what is in the case then?

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A calculator...you probably guessed that already. Albeit a very expensive one for such a basic feature set. This is the important bit.

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This is a Sharp EL-805. The first pocket calculator ever to make use of a liquid crystal display. Rockwell actually got there first to use an LCD in a calculator the previous year, but they were AC powered desktop units...which didn't really take advantage of the low profile nature and low(ish!) power consumption of the technology. Sharp were the first to really take that step.

Yes, I do have the three models using the Rockwell design on my eBay saved search list, because I absolutely want to get hold of one of them obviously!

This isn't the LCD technology you're used to. This was the first commercially applied form of the principle, a dynamic scattering mode (DSM) panel, rather than the twisted nematic displays which took over after only a couple of years. The more modern displays use polarisation changes to block or allow the passage of light, whereas DSM displays simply are totally clear when unpowered or are opaque when power is applied. These early displays were very fragile and used an order of magnitude more power than later display technologies.

While they had their limitations they are extremely striking looking things.

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The EL-805 was particularly noteworthy in that the whole calculator more or less is built on the same panel of glass which the display is constructed from. You actually view the display *through* the circuit board which is quite unusual. This turned out to be a technological dead end really but nevertheless was an interesting approach back in the early 70s. I will of course get some photos of that setup with the case off when I get a chance.

Very glad to have finally got hold of one of these, it's a model which has been on the radar for quite a long time. The last few I've seen have sold for well into three figures so I was quite surprised that the cheeky offer I submitted through eBay was accepted...not complaining though!

The big brother to the EL-805 was the EL-808 which I managed to get hold of last year. This was a far larger portable desktop calculator which was clearly designed to showcase the new display technology at its best.

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If such things interest you, some more information on that one can be found over here.
My website - aka. My *other* waste of time
Current fleet: 73 AC Model 70. 83 Citroen BX 14RE. 85 Sinclair C5. 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE. 86 Mercedes 230TE. 90 Mercedes 208D AutoTrail Navajo.

3xpendable
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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes, Sinclair & AC Model 70

#1036 Post by 3xpendable » Tue Oct 05, 2021 2:21 pm

JPB wrote:
Thu Sep 30, 2021 8:43 am

I rescued my much-missed 911 targa
Did someone say 911 Targa?

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1965 Ford Anglia 106e Estate (Wagon). LHD.
1964 Ford Anglia 105e Saloon

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Zelandeth
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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes, Sinclair & AC Model 70

#1037 Post by Zelandeth » Fri Oct 08, 2021 9:28 pm

This afternoon has been frustrating.

On the plus side, Motorserv reckon I should have a head gasket and inlet manifold gasket ready to collect tomorrow. Hopefully they'll have more luck than Mercedes themselves or the specialist I was trying to order from before.

Fat lot of good it will do me though as the head is still attached to the car.

I've just wasted the best part of two hours trying to get the pin that holds the timing chain guide out.

This pin, which is helpfully drilled and tapped with an M6 thread.

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Should in theory just pull out, using a nut and bolt as an improvised puller seems to be a popular method.

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Yeah...even using the best quality M6 nut and bolt I could find (the ones in the photo were purely to show how things fit together) just ended up mangling the threads on the bolt in one case and shearing off in another.

Basically I need to resort to a slide hammer. Unsurprisingly given this engine's history it's well glued in place. Unfortunately there's not enough space to get in with one.

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So to get in there I'll need to pull out the radiator. Which means I need to disconnect the very crusty looking transmission fluid lines (the oil cooler is integrated into the bottom radiator tank). Oh, and I need to buy a slide hammer as I don't own one.

...Or just buy a new timing chain which comes with a split link...oh...but then I'd need to get the whole timing cover off. To get that off you need to remove the sump...which we've already found is a non trivial process. So I guess we keep messing around with this.

Oh, in case there was any question over whether the head needs to come off... here's a random selection of the journals the camshaft sits in...

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Yep...that's had it! Has been for a long time too given the scored out areas have had time to get varnished deposits on them.
My website - aka. My *other* waste of time
Current fleet: 73 AC Model 70. 83 Citroen BX 14RE. 85 Sinclair C5. 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE. 86 Mercedes 230TE. 90 Mercedes 208D AutoTrail Navajo.

Dick
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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes, Sinclair & AC Model 70

#1038 Post by Dick » Sat Oct 09, 2021 7:39 pm

Bad luck mate, are you sure you don't want to take the engine out? Id lend you my engine crane but you're too far away unless you fancy a bit of a road trip..

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Zelandeth
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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes, Sinclair & AC Model 70

#1039 Post by Zelandeth » Sun Oct 10, 2021 7:37 pm

Dick wrote:
Sat Oct 09, 2021 7:39 pm
Bad luck mate, are you sure you don't want to take the engine out? Id lend you my engine crane but you're too far away unless you fancy a bit of a road trip..
The single biggest issue with removing the engine is that other than sitting in the middle of the garden I've nowhere to work on it. I've also nowhere to park the car on properly solid ground conducive to using an engine crane that isn't blocking access to the garage...so it's something I've really been wanting to avoid.

-- -- --

Having left the timing chain guide pins stewing in Plusgas for a few days I went back for another shot today. Armed with a few high tensile bolts and an assortment of spacers I figured this was the last chance saloon before I get more tools involved and strip things down further.

After far more torque than I would have liked was applied, the pin started to move with a terrifyingly loud crack.

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It was tight all the way out (as expected given it's purely a friction fit), but didn't require stupid amounts of force once it was moving. One removed pin.

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At this point I figured I would be able to withdraw the chain tensioner. Err... apparently not.

A quick consultation with the spare head showed there were actually TWO of these pins. I'd missed this one entirely.

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Partly because I'd just unbolted the thermostat housing from the head and left it otherwise in situ, partly because...well...would you have spotted it under all that slime?

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About 3/4 of a can of carb cleaner and some scrubbing later...hey look, there it is!

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Same process as before...another pin out.

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Which *finally* allowed me to get the chain guide out.

It defied all attempts to usefully photograph it, but there's hardly any visible wear on this, I'd not be surprised if it's been replaced at some point.

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Before pulling that out (which would let the chain go slack) I put a cable tie on it to maintain enough tension to hopefully keep the timing where it should be. I'll obviously rotate things to cyl 1 TDC and check everything anyway before attempting to start it again...but I figure minimising the opportunities for things to move in the meantime can only be a good thing.

Then the swearing really started...as this was when I started to try in earnest to get the head off. Naturally I eventually found a couple of things I'd missed.

The first of these didn't take me long to spot. As well as being secured to one of the rocker cover studs, the transmission fluid dipstick is bolted to the back of the head.

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Yes, that is a crowbar wedged in an exhaust port being used to lift the head... knowing it's scrap metal meant I was a bit less careful of damaging it than I otherwise would have been!

The ones which took me FAR longer to find than they should have though we're the two bolts which attach the inlet manifold to a brace underneath it.

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Once they were out it just lifted off. Well...nearly. it resisted for a moment before I heard something ping off, whizz over my shoulder and bounce off the side of the van.

Oops...I also missed the throttle return spring.

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Guess I'll need a new one of those then. Though if that's the only casualty, I'll take it!

Finally it's off the car.

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It's worth noting that the head was initially cracked from the block about a week ago, so I was expecting a bit of water contamination to be present in the cylinders, and I think that's why the carbon that was present has sort of peeled away. Quite a bit of carb cleaner probably found its way in while I was blasting crud off the outside too.

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After a bit of a wipe down news isn't looking bad. Cross hatching is still clearly visible on the walls of all cylinders.

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I originally thought that was a huge wear ridge at the top...but given the presence of the hone marks I think it's just how this was originally machined.

This is the worst looking bore by a long shot.

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The vast majority of that is above the swept area of the rings, but I'll see if we can clean it up a bit before putting things back together. Looking at the head gasket itself it looks like we might have just been seeing the very early stages of failure between the water jacket and cylinder on the rearmost one - which would tie in with the appearance of moisture having spent time in that bore.

Looking more closely at the head, it's astonishing that there's really no visible difference between number 3 which has had vastly impaired breathing compared to the rest!

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I'm no expert, nor do I play one on TV (or even YouTube), but my gut feeling is that this head hasn't been off before.

Hopefully I should have a new head and inlet manifold gasket set waiting for me tomorrow. That will allow me to swap all the known good injection hardware over to the spare head. Given I know it's working fine I just don't see any reason to disturb it more than necessary
...just transferring the whole manifold with it all attached seems the least likely to introduce gremlins.

Then it will be a matter of lots and lots of cleaning of both the head and the block before we start putting things back together. Then praying it's solved our issues!

In reality this head is about as easy to pull as they get in OHC form...the only reason it's taken me a while to get to this stage is lack of knowledge of this particular engine. If I needed to pull it off again in the future I could do it in half the time.

Yes if I'd read the manual beforehand I'd probably have done it quicker, but I'd not have learned half as much. The one thing I did look up though was the correct sequence for tightening/loosening the head bolts. Good thing as I'd otherwise never have spotted that sneaky one by the warm up regulator.

Before I shut up shop today I made sure to absolutely mist everything (especially the bores) with oil, so no further surface rust can think about forming on things.

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Hopefully you'll soon see me putting that mess back together...Taking bets now on how many bits are left over...

Goes without saying I'll be doing the rebuild more by-the-book though as I don't want to damage the replacement head, whereas the one I was taking off was scrap metal.
My website - aka. My *other* waste of time
Current fleet: 73 AC Model 70. 83 Citroen BX 14RE. 85 Sinclair C5. 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE. 86 Mercedes 230TE. 90 Mercedes 208D AutoTrail Navajo.

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Zelandeth
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Re: Zel's Fleet Blog...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes, Sinclair & AC Model 70

#1040 Post by Zelandeth » Mon Oct 11, 2021 9:56 pm

Let's do a quick side by side comparison of the new and old camshaft journals...

From the front...

Ignore any blocked looking oilways, it's just grease from when I had things in and out a bunch.

1.

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2.

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3.

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4.

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5.

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Think it's fair to say the new one is a bit healthier. Rear coolant line elbow is rather crusty on the old head too.

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New one is in "considerably" better shape thankfully.

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After a bit of deliberation I decided to leave the inlet manifold gasket alone and just swap the fuel distributor over. Not a big job really, only took about an hour to transfer everything over from one head to the other.

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Not forgetting one of the most ridiculously overcomplicated throttle linkages I've seen in a long while.

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Next steps:

[] Remove and reset timing chain tensioner.

[] Remove the remaining studs which are trapped in the exhaust manifold so they match what's present/missing on the new head.

[] Rotate engine to cyl 1 TDC so I can set the timing properly, reset distributor as necessary.

[] Clean up block and head surfaces.

[] Reassemble.

[] Flush sump out with copious amounts of diesel to get as much gunk out from there as possible.

[] Pray I've made things better than worse!

Feels like we're making progress at least...

I do at least have a head gasket in my hand now.

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In other news...well there isn't any really! Just business as usual.

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Hopefully we'll manage to keep up a bit of momentum on getting the Merc back together.
My website - aka. My *other* waste of time
Current fleet: 73 AC Model 70. 83 Citroen BX 14RE. 85 Sinclair C5. 85 Jaguar XJ-S V12 HE. 86 Mercedes 230TE. 90 Mercedes 208D AutoTrail Navajo.

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